Sunday, April 18, 2010

U.S. Lawyer Richard Fine Jailed, Denied Rights for Exposing Corruption

Cassandra Anderson
Infowars.com
April 14, 2010
The U.S. Supreme Court will be holding a private conference hearing on Friday, April 23rd 2010, to determine whether to hold a full court hearing on corruption charges within the Los Angeles County government for illegally imprisoning attorney Richard Fine. A rally to acknowledge the U.S. Supreme Court hearing will be held at the L.A. Superior Court building at 8 am Tuesday April 20th, by supporters of Richard Fine’s release from illegal imprisonment. Mainstream media has avoided any mention of this epic corruption scandal, despite its significance, and now it is on its way to the the Supreme Court.
Richard Fine, who holds a PhD in international law and served as an anti-trust prosecutor at the Department of Justice in Washington D.C., has been in jail in the L.A. County Jail for over a year in solitary confinement. He never had a trial, there has been no conviction, nor any sentence to keep him there. Sheriff LeRoy Baca claims he does not know why Fine is in jail, yet he keeps him there and failed to answer Fine’s Writ of Habeas Corpus. Baca refused to allow a filmed interview with Fine until Judicial Watch filed a lawsuit on behalf of Full Disclosure Network, and then, out of the blue, he “changed his mind” and granted a filmed interview with them!



Fine believes he is imprisoned because of political reasons:
1. Fine exposed L.A. Superior Court judges of taking illegal money from the County, in violation of the California State Constitution.
2. The County Supervisors were using public tax money to pay off the Superior Court judges.
3. The Superior Court Judges decided cases in favor of the County (Fine reports that since 2005 to present, only 3 people have won cases against the County as a result of the bribes).
4. The California State Legislature have given the judges and County Supervisors immunity from prosecution for their actions and misappropriation of taxpayer money.
5. The judges have tried to get Mr. Fine disbarred from the California State Bar as a result of the lawsuit he filed on behalf of the taxpayers who were denied “due process”.
6. Superior Court Judge David Yaffe (accused judge) failed to recuse himself and sent Fine to prison. He also failed to cite any precedent (denying Fine “due process”).
7. L.A. County Sheriff LeRoy Baca illegally imprisoned Fine, and Fine is in jail today.
8. Fine should have been released within 5 days, according to the law. FULL STORY

California lawlessness same as in Washington

Stephen Lendman
Date: April 19, 2010
Subject: Police State

The Law Offices of Richard I. Fine & Associates (richardfinelaw.com) web site says he established the firm in 1974. His credentials include a Doctor of Law from the University of Chicago, a Ph.D in International Law from the London School of Economics, a Certificate from the Hague Academy of International Law, among his many other awards, including Lawyer of the Decades 1976 - 2006.



On April 9, Contra Costa Times writer Troy Anderson headlined, "Supreme Court to hear Fine case," quoting Brooklyn Law School Professor Jayne Ressler, an expert in "coercive confinement" saying:
"The fact the Supreme Court is involved in any way is a big deal. It certainly speaks volumes to the importance of this case, and it's quite intriguing."

The US Supreme Court will hear his case on April 23. It gets thousands of applications annually, but considers about 80 or 90 at most. His appeal cites the precedent of a Los Angeles newspaper reporter jailed in 1972, in contempt, for refusing to divulge sources relating to the Charles Manson case. After six weeks in confinement, the US Supreme Court ordered him released while his case was considered by the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. "Lower courts later determined that lengthy confinements for contempt" are to punish in violation of "legal limits on punitive sentences for contempt." FULL STORY

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